Study finds that moisturisers don’t prevent baby eczema

Study finds that moisturisers don't prevent baby eczema

According to a major new study led by team of dermatologists in Nottingham, UK, using moisturisers on babies doesn’t prevent eczema.

Researchers examined nearly 1,400 babies and found that, even if the babies were regularly moisturized, it had no effect on whether the baby developed eczema later.

Scientists said the findings were “surprising” as many healthcare workers advise parents to moisturize their newborns regularly to avoid eczema.

How the newborn baby eczema study was conducted

This study involved six universities from across the UK, with 1,394 newborn babies. All babies has family members with eczema, asthma or hay fever.

The babies were split randomly into two groups. In one group, parents were advised to apply moisturiser every day until the baby’s first birthday. The other group was asked to avoid using moisturiser.

But the results showed no difference in the number of babies who had developed eczema between those who used moisturisers vs. those who didn’t. View results of the study

The results showed no difference in the number of babies who developed eczema, whether they regularly moisturised or not.

The results may be disappointing for parents who are trying to prevent eczema in their babies. But, at least parents will know what doesn’t work.

For babies with eczema, moisturiser is still important

However, the researchers clarified that, even if moisturisers did not prevent eczema, they are still useful for people who already have the condition.

“It is important not to confuse our study on moisturisers for eczema prevention with the use of moisturisers for people who have eczema, where the evidence of benefit is much greater.”

Professor Hywel Williams, dermatologist at Nottingham University

Moisturisers are the most common method to relieve eczema, so it’s important to find the right one for your skin.

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